Thursday, June 7, 2012

Back again... Giveaways and a book blog tour stop...

After all my posts on how to manage my time and scheduling my posts, I again have been away for some time now. Back again today with two giveaways/reviews coming over this weekend as well as a blog tour next week. Details coming very soon . so please stay tuned......

TTT: Top Ten Tuesday theme this week at The Broke and the Bookish was rewind week and since I have missed the last few weeks anyways, I picked this one - Top Ten All Time Favorite Characters. I am not sure if I will cover my all-time, or will be able to remember to include (am sure I will have enough 'How could I forget.." moments as I go through other lists), but here it is (in a chronological order from my childhood to now):
1. Jo from 'Little Women' by Louisa May Alcott
2. Katy from 'What Katy Did' by Susan Coolidge
3. George(or rather Georgina) and Julian from the Famous Five series by Enid Blyton
4. Asterix from Asterix and Obelix comics
5. Michael from 'The Mayor of Casterbridge' by Thomas Hardy
6. Atticus Finch from 'To Kill a Mockingbird' by Harper Lee
7. Rhett Butler from 'Gone with the Wind' by Margaret Mitchell
8. Haroun from 'Haroun and the Sea of Stories' by Salman Rushdie
9.  Hema and Matron from 'Cutting for Stone' by Abraham Varghese

10. Liesel Meminger from 'The Book Thief' by Markus Zusak

 For Wondrous Words Wednesday: has been a long time since I participated in this one, one of my favorite memes...
  • prate v. [intrans.] talk foolishly or tediously about something. prat·er n. (RARE). late Middle English: from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German praten, probably of imitative origin.
  • spancel - noun 1. a noosed rope with which to hobble an animal, especially a horse or cow. verb (used with object) 2. to fetter with or as with a spance
  • man·u·mit v. (-mit·ted, -mit·ting) [trans.] HISTORICAL release from slavery; set free. man·u·mis·sion n. man·u·mit·ter n. late Middle English: from Latin manumittere, literally 'send forth from the hand', from manus 'hand' + mittere 'send'.
  • obdurate -adjective 1. unmoved by persuasion, pity, or tender feelings; stubborn; unyielding. 2. stubbornly resistant to moral influence; persistently impenitent

For Theme Thursday, the theme is Month
Theme Thursdays is a fun weekly event that will be open from one thursday to the next. Anyone can participate in it. The rules are simple:
  • A theme will be posted each week (on Thursday’s)
  • Select a conversation/snippet/sentence from the current book you are reading
  • Mention the author and the title of the book along with your post
  • It is important that the theme is conveyed in the sentence (you don’t necessarily need to have the word)
"200:Number of deserted ships in San Francisco Bay on June 4, 1849.The crews had all abandoned them to seek their fortunes in the gold fields."
From 'Uncle John's Bathroom Reader Plunges into California'


a few more meme posts along with details of upcoming blog tour and the giveaways to follow.

6 comments:

  1. That's a lot of ships abandoned in the bay!

    Here's my Theme Post

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  2. Stephen King used obdurate in 11/22/63 fairly often so I knew that one!

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    1. that book is still on my TBR:) and though I had seen this word before, did not really know what it meant.

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  3. Ive come across manumit relatively recently, but had forgotten it already, nice to be reminded.

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    1. thanks for visiting Louise.. manumit was new for me and it was interesting since was difficult to guess the meaning of the word.

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Love to hear from you! I do read all your comments and do reply whenever I can.. but I will definitely hop on over to visit you...